Olive Strachan North West Export Champion 2016
Inspiring Business North West
phone +44 (0) 161 209 3950

"Catch a man a fish

Feed him for a day

Teach him how to fish

And feed him for life"

For me, the unknown author of the above quote perfectly captured what coaching is all about: releasing the potential in someone.

Do you use coaching as a resource to cultivate and develop the employees in your organisation? At Olive Strachan Resources, I have coached and mentored people for many years, and I am a great believer in personal development and training. As part of my quest for continuous personal development, I too have embarked on the ILM Level 7 Diploma in Executive Coaching and Mentoring, an intensive and experiential programme which requires extensive practice and reading outside the formal tutorial workshops.

Historically, most of my coaching has taken place inside offices, which can sometimes - if you are in a confined space, having a one-to-one with another individual - can be a very intense and concentrated experience. The ILM focused on a contemporary programme that specialised in coaching but also utilised the environment to further enhance the coaching experience. This involved working with a coachee whislt walking around Lake Buttermere in Keswick. It was truly an amazing experience; the beauty and stillness of the surrounding environment and the sense of being at one with the elements allowed each person to reflect deeply, making use of mind, body, and spirit.

Here is another famous quote that I feel captures the essence of coaching - this one is from Ralph Waldo Emerson:

"What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us."

As the summer months approach, I am looking forward to the balmy summer weather, which will offer my coachees at Olive Strachan Resources the opportunity to leave the constraints of the office to embrace and experience the beauty of nature whilst discovering their full potential and finding exactly 'what lies within us'.

An article by BBC business correspondent Jonty Bloom entitled 'Why the Productivity Gap?' states that "bad management alone accounts for a quarter of the difference between the productivity in the UK and that of our rivals"! One question we should ask ourselves is why are our managers falling behind, and have we invested in their development? Being a manager is an extremely challenging role, and without training, support and coaching, they can wreak havoc, resulting in high staff turnover, high sickness rates, conflict and stress.  Having worked as a manager for 30 years, here are my seven steps to being an effective people manager.

 

The definition of management is 'getting things done through people'. Our research shows that post-recession, due to the lack of investment in first line managers, the essential skills of building trust and developing a relationship with staff are the areas that managers find most challenging. As the old adage goes, people do not leave companies, they leave managers, so having managers who are competent when it comes to managing people is an essential tool for any organisation. So what are the essential steps?

 

1. Get the right mindset

 Run your department as a commercial business; understand your place in the organisation, where you fit in and your impact. Read the organisation's strategic plan, and establish how your department fits into this plan. Constantly review your job role and that of your team; often, after working at an organisation for a period of time, we can forget why we were employed in the first place. We tend to perform the parts of our job role we enjoy, not what we are being paid for.

 

2. Define and clarify a clear vision and values

 It is difficult to get employees to achieve goals and gain their commitment if they do not understand where the business is going and their place within it. Do you have a clear vision? What are the values that underpin this? Are you sharing it in a creative way? I recently met a HR Director at a networking event who shared with me his method of achieving this. He put together a festival involving the whole organisation; they had bunting everywhere around the office, for the auditory staff there was music (including karaoke) and for the kinaesthetic amongst them there were games and fun interactions. A key part of this event was getting all staff to take part in the festival, and each individual was given a list of values to choose from. The outcome was that they helped to shape company values. A clear winner was showing appreciation for each other and saying thank you!

 

3. Involve your team in the decision-making process

 We cannot always act on staff feedback, but we can listen and get their opinion. We have all experienced the situation where decisions are imposed on us without any rhyme or reason, leaving us feeling undervalued. The earlier example I gave about the staff involvement in setting the values means that they are more likely to get behind them and support them in the future e.g. for performance meetings et cetera. It also means that we all speak a common language: if I had a penny for each time I have delivered a training programme where the question 'what are your company values?' has been met with the reply 'to make money', I would be a very rich woman.

 

4. Understand what makes your staff tick!

 Whether you use Myers Briggs, the Thomas International DISC model or TetraMap, it is vital that you understand how your team work and how to get the best out of them. When I am coaching a manager who is having issues with getting the best from his/her team, I will often ask them to tell me about their team members: their good and bad points, their strengths and weaknesses, and how they motivate them. Often, they have a particular person they are close to but have not taken the time to have one to ones or delve a little deeper into their team's specific needs. A manager is like the conductor of an orchestra: how can you create harmony without knowledge? When this is brought up during training or coaching sessions, managers often say that they have no time to coach their staff or have one to one meetings. Ignore this at your peril; this lack of knowledge leads to underutilisation of staff, demotivation, and a lack of engagement.

 

5. Hold regular meetings

 Staff need an opportunity to share their thoughts and ideas and receive honest feedback. A meeting should not be the manager just imparting their opinions; if possible, rotate who chairs the meeting, allowing staff to set the agenda. This will give the manager a great insight into the employees' needs. The meeting need not be a long, drawn-out process; three key items on the agenda could be:

  • What have we achieved that we are proud of?
  • What do we need to be concerned about?
  • What do we need to focus on next?

 

6. Communicate and share information

 I do not advocate 'mushroom management' - keeping people in the dark to enhance the power of the manager. Staff are knowledgeable about what to expect from their managers, and they expect to be consulted, listened to, developed, and to receive appropriate praise and rewards. Once, when I was delivering a Customer Services programme, staff on the course had no idea regarding how they were perceived by their customers as the management had not shared with them that there had been an increase in customer complaints. So my training course was the first time they had seen figures and condensed feedback. When they arrived, they did not know why they were attending the training programme; when they left, they were fired up, determined to turn things around with a selection of solutions. Often, the solutions to organisational problems can be found if you communicate and share.

 

7. Sell it to them

It never ceases to amaze me when managers say: 'We have this new initiative, but all my team are against it. They just can’t see the benefit of implementing it!' I always ask: 'How did you sell it to them?' The manager usually replies: 'I just told them that it was happening and we had no choice as higher management said we had to do it.' Well surprise, surprise - negative delivery of the message gets a negative response! Managers often make things difficult for themselves by not preparing how to deliver bad news or change processes to their staff. In order to get everyone on-side, there has to be some time spent preparing what you are going to say and how you are going to say it, making sure it is motivational, with prepared answers for challenging questions.

 

If you have enjoyed these 7 key points for being an effective people manager and want to hear more, our next Effective People Manager course will be held on the 26th of May, at Peters House in Manchester.

https://www.olivestrachan.com/courses/the-effective-people-manager/88

Olive Strachan MSc, HRM, Chartered FCIPD,

CIPD Council Representative and HR Leader 

Managing Consultant, Global Executive Coach and Motivational Speaker

2015-16 Woman of Influence in the North West

I recently attended the 2016 IoD Director of the Year Awards at the Gala dinner ceremony at the Hilton in Manchester.

The Institute of Directors exists to inspire leaders and support organisations. It is the UK's largest and longest-established membership organisation for directors and professional leaders.

The IoD Award ceremony recognises the achievements of business leaders across the region, from entrepreneurs driving innovative start-ups to global organisations with multi-million-pound turnovers.

It was an evening of laughter and joyfulness for the winners and their organisations, and those of us not nominated for an award were just really pleased to be there to support entrepreneurs and be part of a really positive and joyful occasion.

In a beautiful room at the Hilton, there were 350 of us dressed in our finery and doing something we all love doing: celebrating success.

I was invited by Clive Drinkwater from UKTI (encompassing my role as Export Champion), and we were seated at the front of the auditorium, near the stage - which was great because I like to be near the action!

One of the Directors commented on recognition and that resonated with me. He mentioned Maslow and how important it is to receive recognition for your efforts. Whether you use Maslow, Herzerg, or Neuroscience to understand what drives and motivates us, Directors - just like anyone - need someone to say 'well done!'

When I was working in recruitment back at the start of my career, we would view the 'Directors' of the organisation with envy as they walked through the office in their lovely suits. In preparation for their visit, we had to wear our uniforms, have the office cleaned from top to bottom, clear our desks of any paperwork, and sit in anticipation of possibly being the member of staff they spoke to during their visit. I would look at the Directors and think 'what do they do?' After they had gone, there would be lots of grumbling about how privileged they were because the visit would normally end with our manager taking the Director to the best restaurant for dinner before they departed. From my point of view at the time, Directors did not need any recognition as I felt that their salaries, cars, and all the other benefits they received were reward enough.

Fast forward 20 years and I am now the Director of my own business, with staff, offices, a bank loan, two children, and a mortgage. I now have to be the swan: serene above the surface whilst pedalling furiously below. The training market is a turbulent one; as the saying goes, when money is tight, the first thing to go is...training.

My company, Olive Strachan Resources, has weathered two recessions, and this involved sometimes having to make tough decisions (and, consequently, staff redundant) in order to survive. At the height of the recession, I used to go home every night unable to sleep; my hair started falling out, and I was constantly worried. During these difficult times, friends - no matter how loyal they are - eventually get  bored with listening to you sharing your distress, and so this is the time when you need a mentor or a coach to keep you keep on track. 

I would recommend that every director should avail themselves of a coach or mentor at some point in their career. As someone who has run a business for the past 18 years, I also coach and mentor others helping them to reach their full potential.

Fortunately, OSR have been able to withstand two recessions - I am extremely resilient and, with the help of UKTI, I was able find new markets abroad, win an international contract, and bounce back.

My point is that being a Director can be a lonely experience. You have to be a risk-taker and live with the consequences of those risks. When things look impossible, you have to somehow have a vision of how to make it better, think of a solution and mobilise your team to achieve your goal.

So any opportunity to champion business success, recognise and congratulate Directors for demonstrating strength in leadership to drive their organisations forward is extremely positive.

A great source of pride for me was the number of female Directors recognised on the night: Chartered Director of the Year Jo Rizema of WCF LTD, International Director of the Year Emma Sheldon of Vernacare Ltd, Public Sector/Third Sector Director of the Year Yvonne Harrison  of GreaterSport, and Diane Modahl who is CEO of the Diane Modahl sports Foundation she received her award for Director of the Year Leadership in Corporate Responsibility. It was an excellent event and I left feeling extremely positive! 

Recently, I was proud to host another Olive Branch event alongside my good friend and colleague Anne Clews. We incorporated the TetraMap® into the session, which was held at the fab venue of TLT LLP in Spinningfields, Manchester.

Over 30 delegates attended the session to find out about the elements that make up the TetraMap® Tetrahedron. This is the minimum structural system in the Universe (Buckminster Fuller, 1895-1983), a four sided pyramid structure.

TetraMap® is a behavioural model that originated in New Zealand, and I am proud to say that both and I are trained facilitators. This powerful tool helps individuals to better understand themselves and how they can build stronger relationships with others. It is designed to develop an inspirational learning experience. The TetraMap® instrument measures our elemental preferences rather than our strengths and weaknesses.

The event heped delegates to focus on how to build resilience and effectiveness through developing their natural brands. Once everyone had their personal TetraMap® profile, they were given the opportunity to create a clear plan to enhance their natural learning abilities. TetraMap® is the globally-proven learning model that assists in discovering 'who you are naturally and what is your natural fit'. It is based on the elements of nature: Earth (like a mountain is firm), Fire (like the sun is bright), Water (like a lake is calm), and finally Air (like the wind is clear). It is an inspiring model that starts with building upon self-esteem and awareness, and gives a shared framework and approach for the way people think.

Ladies were evenly split into the various elements when it came to the presentations, and the sessions proved to be effective and fun for all. After the Olive Branch event, everyone left with the knowledge that will help them to:

  • Build better relationships
  • Create a vision
  • Be results-focused
  • Have a personal strategy for effectiveness

The feedback was fantastic and many of the ladies have already enrolled on our our TetraMap® Facilitators workshop, taking place 20-22 April in Manchester. If you'd like to find out which elements you are and how TetraMap® can accelerate positive change within your organisation, please contact olive@olivestrachan.com to enrol.

We are pleased to announce that our CEO Olive Strachan has been selected as an Export Champion 2016 to represent the UKTI NW (this initiative is unique to the North West). The first Export Champions were recruited for 2013, and have done a great job spreading the word about the benefits of international trade.

As a region, we in the North West need to sell more products and services overseas, and Olive is determined to encourage and support as many companies as possible to take up the export challenge. Here at OSR, we want to ensure that people know about the opportunities of exporting and the important UKTI North West does. The team alongside Olive are really looking forward to the challenges of 2016 and advocating the excellent work of the UKTI.

We at OSR will be offering courses to support the exporting initiative, including Cultural Sensitivity - A Guide to the Business Culture of the Gulf. This programme will assist UK companies wishing to trade in Gulf markets. It will provide each business with a good knowledge of cultural values and beliefs, as well as essential business etiquette. This course has been developed by experts who have worked and completed business negotiations and traded in the Gulf region. It will arm any professional with the key knowledge required to do business in the Gulf. The programme fits right in with the following OSR Values:

  • Inspiration - Inspiring others to reach their potential
  • Quality - Striving for excellence
  • Passion - Being committed to giving the best we can
  • Integrity - Being authentic at all times
  • Community - Giving something back
  • Collaboration - Providing specialist knowledge

2016 looks like it will be a busy year for OSR, and Olive's dedication and passion shine through at all times. As she steps up to tackle her new responsibilities, she is determined to make exporting great!

World of Opportunity Awaits

Earlier this month I was privileged to be part of the line-up of speakers for the UKTI North West ‘spotlight on the Middle East’ event in Runcorn. This event was specifically to help businesses to understand and take advantage of the opportunities available in the Middle East. This is a topic in the first issue of People Management Middle East. Peter Cheese Chief Executive; CIPD mentions that he believes that HR can make a huge difference in the Middle East. Bearing this in mind the CIPD now have offices in Dubai. They have increased their presence on the ground over the past year hosting several networking events including Peter Cheese speaking at the Annual HR Summit in Bahrain.

Having had the pleasure of working with UKTI North West for a number of years being part of their Passport to Export programme and having availed myself of their excellent services on numerous occasions I find them invaluable and would recommend UKTI to any organisations that operates globally. At the Runcorn event Clive Drinkwater, Julian Birchett, Sandra Thornber and the team organised an interesting and informative experience for all the attendees.

It was an event that I thoroughly enjoyed and found extremely beneficial. Emma Parsons from the Bahrain Embassy gave an informative presentation on living and working in Bahrain offering some excellent hints and tips together with pertinent contacts. Glenn Cooper of ATG Access took us through his journey of building an international business focusing on Saudi Arabia and Iraq, the highs and lows but also sharing the benefit of his experience. Diana from The English Manner shared her experience of working in the United Arab Emirates. As one of the speakers I shared Olive Strachan Resources and my experience of working in Qatar and Bahrain since 2004.

As a speaker on the day but also having the opportunity to listen to other speaker’s one of the key messages that was reinforced time and time again was regarding ‘Cultural Sensitivity’. It is vital to:

Complete your research:
  • Explore and immerse yourself in the culture
  • Learn the laws and the social etiquette
  • Try to learn some of the language – I always learn how to say good morning in the country I am working in.
  • Understand economic drivers and future plans e.g. there is a drive from an almost total reliance on oil and gas to a sustainable future as knowledge and innovation led markets.
Build a personal brand:
  • Have a key differentiator
  • Present yourself well
  • Dress/speak appropriately
  • Have an area of expertise
‘Your brand is what people say about you when you are not in the room.’ Jeff Bezos, Founder Amazon

Know your social media channels:

Know Your  Social Media Channels

So it is vital that your organisation has a social media presence or you will be missing out on a large and lucrative market.

Build your network:

In the Middle East there is a big emphasis on recommendations and being well thought of is more important than being widely known.

Having a previous client refer you to a future one is the most effective manner of creating a presence.

If you are part of a trade or professional body this is a great way of making contact.

I am a member of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development and the UKTI are both excellent methods of making contact with international clients. If you attend the annual CIPD conference in Manchester there were many international organisations who were also in attendance and the UKTI have many trade missions that facilitate introductions to business contacts.

Opportunities:

Statistics from CIPD People Management magazine for the Middle East state that 37% of Middle East organisations plan to increase spending on employee training.

Women entrepreneurs are forging ahead in the Middle East and I have first-hand experience of this. A few years ago when I worked in Oman delivering a Springboard session to women entrepreneurs I was impressed by the variety of businesses and the amount of savvy professional women running their own businesses.

In addition, the penetration of smartphones in the Middle East is amongst the highest in the world!

As I previously mentioned having worked in the Middle East for 10 years I would recommend that we grasp the opportunity to work there. I have made some lovely friends who I am in contact with on a regular basis either in person or by using social media. The generosity and kindness I have received has been wonderful.

If you would like any further details about working in the Middle East or to attend our Cultural Sensitivity programme. Call me on: Office : 0161 209 3950, Mobile: 07739 763 750


Having worked in a professional environment since the beginning of my career there has been a lot of change in the way organisations and individuals do business together. We were not encouraged to share information or work with others, we were told to; Go out there! Close that deal! Make it happen! This was reflected in your PDR’s when you would often be asked the question ‘what have you achieved?’ What added value have you brought to this organisation through your individual effort?

Fast forward to today and how things have changed! The word collaboration or being collaborative is part of most competency frameworks, with employees being encouraged to demonstrate that they are collaborating not only with colleagues within their business but with other organisations that may complement what they do. We are encouraged to increase our visibility through communication and influencing skills.

I have been on the Manchester Branch of the CIPD for many years and the values of the CIPD are around;

P A C E

Which stand for:
  • Purposeful
  • Agile
  • Collaborative
  • Expert
Once again that word Collaborative features as part of the values they hold dear.

As the CEO and founder of Olive Strachan Resources the word collaborate is a call to action. To be collaborative we have to reach out to others and demonstrate the business benefits of working together. In October of this year I experienced collaboration at its best. On 6th October we collaborated with TLT Solicitors to organise The Olive Branch networking event for professional business women. The event involved professional women sitting together to plan an event that would inform, interest and inspire people to come along and give up their valuable time.

TLT were gracious enough to host the event and provide us with a beautiful venue together with a delicious healthy lunch which was extremely popular. The event was in two parts, eating for maximum brain health and managing and retaining your talent. The feedback was extremely positive with everyone saying how worthwhile the event was and they had found it very beneficial. I was also asked ‘when the next event would take place’.

The second successful collaboration was with Hays recruitment specialist who were kind enough to host the CIPD HR Leaders event on 8th October. This was a breakfast event and Chris Maguire the Editor of Insider magazine gave us an insight into the world of newspapers and the changes he had observed over the years. It was rewarding to see a variety of organisations network over coffee and croissants. This event also involved Hay’s inviting along some of their clients who are HR Leaders to network with CIPD Chartered Fellows.

The feedback was fantastic and everyone had appreciated the opportunity to meet other North West businesses and enjoyed sharing insights into current issues. A benchmark of a good event is when an hour after the event has finished, there are still people sitting there reluctant to leave.

What are the benefits of collaborating?
  • We bring people together who would normally never meet in the scheme of things.
  • We learn from each other, each person has a different view point and methodology
  • We form new friendships and links that could be life changing
  • We learn new skills
  • We grow our business
  • We raise our profile in the business world and I could go on and on…
What should you do?
  • If you haven’t already then add collaboration to your marketing and PR plan.
  • Look for organisations that complement your own.
  • Clarify the outcomes of the collaboration so that there is no ambiguity
  • Have planning meetings so that on the day it runs smoothly with each person understanding their role and their contribution to the event.
  • Review and evaluate so that you can make any improvements next time.
Social Media

Use Social media to create some excitement around the event and raise awareness; we made use of twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook. It is very important to liaise with the organisations you are collaborating with so that you have a clear and consistent message.

Big NO NO’s

If you are using a speaker always see them in action before you use them and clarify that if they are good enough their product or service will speak for themselves. The lasting impression is how good your service or product is and NOT a big sales pitch. There is nothing worse than taking time out to go to an event when the speaker does not divulge the information you expect to be imparted. Instead they give you a teaser then proceed to ask you to view their website or read their book or register on their next event costing x amount so you will hear the rest!!

There you have it! So go ahead, collaborate! Share! Enjoy. I felt a sense of pride and achievement at both of my events this week and plan many more! If you feel you would like to work with OSR on future events email olive@olivestrachan.com

Olive Strachan profile

Olive Stracahan is the founder of Olive Strachan Resources, established in 1998 and based in Manchester, United Kingdom. Since setting up her own consultancy, Olive has delivered training that makes an impact all over the world. OSR creates bespoke solutions for any size of business, delivers cost-effective open programmes, and provides specialist advice for companies that do not have a dedicated in-house HR resource. 

Olive is an International Management Consultant, Expert Trainer, Motivational Speaker  and Executive Coach who started her career in the Recruitment industry working as a manager and coach for Reed Employment, Blue Arrow and Addeco.  Olive then pursued a career with Video Arts Training, establishing their first learning resource centre in Manchester. In essence, Olive has been developing Managers for over 25 years. 

Working in over 20 countries has given Olive the experience and understanding of International Business. This experience, combined with a Masters Degree in Human Resources Management, ensures that she is able to understand the issues that face organisations. Olive has travelled extensively and is an experienced facilitator; her main niche incorporates and develops managers, directors and working with individuals to reach their full potential. 

Olive Strachan has received all kinds of awards and accolades for her work as a training consultant. Many different organisations and institutions have acknowledged Olive’s achievements, and her twin talents for training and business coaching continue to earn recognition from all corners of the globe, including awards for:

  • Showcase Volunteer CIPD PACE Award 2014
  • One of the most influential Women in Business in the North West 2013/2014
  • The EMBF North West award for International Business
  • Recognised by the Worldwide Who's Who

Olive has worked with national organisations including Astra Zeneca, The British Council and Manchester City Council, Keele University, Packaging Automation, Irwell Valley Housing, Brand Additions, and international organisations within sectors such as pharmaceuticals, the financial sector, retail, banking, and education. She was also involved in developing the volunteers for the Commonwealth Games when it was held in Manchester. Olive has recently achieved an ILM Level 7 in Coaching and Learning, and she is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. An ex-Chair, of the CIPD Manchester Branch, Olive is presently an HR Leader for the Branch and a CIPD Council Representative.

I recently returned from a fabulous two-week break in the Caribbean to visit and spend some quality time with my family. I have returned rejuvenated and refreshed, re-engergised and refocused. This is how I would describe myself after a lovely holiday on the beautiful island of Dominica.

I meet with dozens of Senior Leaders every week, helping them to grow their teams and get more productivity out of themselves and the people they work with. Some feel the time to just think and switch off is limited, and a great deal of research has made clear the need for Leaders to take a quality break in order to re-energise, revitalise and refocus themselves and thus boost their businesses.

The great Microsoft guru Bill Gates has been known to escape to a secluded spot for what he calls 'think week', during which time his family, friends and employees are allegedly banned from disturbing him. This time to himself, with just his thoughts for company, serves as his thinking and creative time, and it has helped him to come up with his most innovative ideas. Another entrepreneur, Michael Karnjanaprakorn, has commented that 'think week' (which Facebook chairman Mark Zuckerberg also advocates) will "invigorate your thinking!"

Professor Cary Cooper's research supports this theory, suggesting that 'people who take holidays return feeling healthier and psychologically more robust'. I can certainly endorse this theory myself.

Spending time away in a tropical paradise definitely gave me the boost and thinking time I needed. I have reflected and identified the ways in which this timely and much-needed break benefitted me and my business.

The trip to Dominica allowed me to get away from my organisation, people, media, and business culture and get back to nature. This enabled me to return refocused to lead, inspire, and close deals. I had time to put major challenges into perspective, and various solutions arose about how these can be expedited. Standing on a volcanic, mineral-rich beach with the waves of the Atlantic Ocean roaring in the background, the sun setting in the distance, and lush vegetation all around helped me to focus my mind on the issues that are of vital importance. Although only recently returned, I will continue to reflect and refocus, and I will certainly be recommending the beautiful island of Dominica to my clients! I just can't wait to go back!

Meanwhile, as founder of OSR, I'll continue to nurture aspirations and fulfil professional dreams.

OSR logo

Your personal presence is the experience people remember and the memory of you that they take away. For example, the inner 'you' creates the outer 'you', and how you feel inside and your wellbeing makes a huge difference to how you portray yourself to others. Our outer behaviour is driven by inner factors such as self-belief, confidence, purpose, likeability, authenticity, and a determination to succeed. It also includes Mind Space and elements relating to this, which are Functionality, Sociability, and Mental and Spiritual Wellbeing. One of the factors that impact on your health and how we feel inwardly and outwardly is stress. When we encounter stress, we have less 'get up and go'.

Our energy levels leave us feeling low, and with less energy, this in turn can affect the digestive system and our choice of food. Therefore, nutrition plays a key part in your wellbeing and how you manifest yourself to others. There are also 4 key areas that are crucial for health; these are All Day Energy, Enhanced Memory, Improved Sleep, and Balanced Mood.

Reflective Coaching can also help to eliminate the symptoms of stress and aid your persistent negative thoughts. Gradually over time you will re-train the way you approach yourself and find your inner confidence. Through nutrition and coaching, your memory and energy levels will increase and you will improve your concentration and cognition. In turn, these actions will help you to develop the inner and outer 'brand you'. Feeding the Brain is a combination of mind, body, and brain, and how we use nutrients and coaching to aid your all-round wellbeing.

Olive Strachan will be joining nutritionist Jeannette Jackson at UK Fast Campus, Birley Fields, Manchester, M15 5QJ on Wednesday July 22nd from 2pm - 4pm. This FREE event is open to managers, HR, OD and occupational health staff, To book, please email info@inspirecorporate.tv.

 

Feed your brain MCR

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