Olive Strachan North West Export Champion 2016
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Jul31

Celebrating Success

Posted by olive

Olive Strachan with Packaging Automation

I recently received an exciting and unexpected email:

Hi Olive,

We are going to an awards dinner on 13th July because we are finalists in three categories, the whole management team are going and we would love you to join us, as you have been closely involved in our journey and our success.

This email was from Sam Ashton, Operations Director of Packaging Automation Ltd in Knutsford, who I have been working with on various projects since 2014. As a Learning and Development/HR Consultant I work for myself and we often work with organisations in various capacities. You know you have had a positive impact, but you don’t often have a chance to share in the success. It was lovely to be invited to the awards ceremony, sharing the recognition received by my clients.

The 2017 E3 Business Awards evening took place on Thursday 13th July at the Macron Stadium in Bolton. The winners were announced in front of an audience of over 500 business delegates. There were seventeen award categories. The winning companies and individuals came from organisations across the North West: from Cumbria to Cheshire, Merseyside to Manchester. It was an amazing evening with each business having the opportunity to speak on a video about why they deserve to be recognised.

We were not successful for two of the three categories, so as they announced the ‘Manufacturing Business of the Year 2017’ we sat there tense, with our hearts beating fast. Sam Ashton appeared on the screen sharing the company's many achievements with the rapt audience. This was a challenging category because the winner had to demonstrate:

  • Excellent sales performance and growth prospects
  • A strong pioneering spirit in new product development
  • Manufacturing innovation and the use of technology
  • Quality and continuous improvement
  • Investment in people
  • Evidence of staff training / mentoring

As soon as they announced Packaging Automation as the winner, our table erupted. I was invited to join the senior leadership team on the stage and we danced towards it cheering and clapping to the music. It was such a fantastic feeling. Everyone joined together their faces reflecting pride and elation. This was the culmination of all their hard work.

Packaging Automation at the 2017 E3 Business Awards

When we returned to our table with the award, both Neil and Sam Ashton spoke with pride about their staff, acknowledging that each member had impacted on the organisation’s success.

Neil paid tribute to his staff saying the following:

"I know the effort that’s gone into the last four years by everybody and these awards are not easy to win. Recognition from other industry and business leaders add to all the other positive feedback we receive and it’s great to know we’ve achieved another accolade.

"We have so much more to achieve and many more challenges ahead and with the belief we have anything is possible. We will continue our journey which can only mean more success.

"Well done everyone!"

So, what has been the impact of celebrating success?

  • Celebrating milestones does have a positive impact on employee well-being and engagement. Staff feel that they are contributing to the long-term success of the organisation.

  • It contributes to the stories and myths that will be told in the future about the organisation, e.g. 'Remember when we won that award?'

  • It motivates staff to focus on the next goal, the next award.

  • It helps build collaborative relationships - other organisations are now contacting them to ask for their advice and support.

  • It makes them an employer of choice. Success is contagious!

I feel an immense pride in working with this amazing organisation, who are leading the way in the manufacturing field.

Thank you again for allowing me to share in your successful journey.

With the start of Brexit, Theresa May and her team will have to hone their influencing and persuading skills, which after all, are the key tenets of any negotiation. In a change process or just in everyday work, leaders often come across situations where they need the support of people or groups around them.

One of the key skills of a Leader is the ability to influence others in order to get what they want. To do this effectively they need to be organised in the way they get you to think about the situation and plan their actions. Influencing is the process of gaining the support and commitment of others in achieving your goals.

Influence is about people not things – it comes to a person from another person and it develops through an awareness of what people think about that person and their ideas. What others think is partly to do with the impression a person makes, their manner and the way they speak.

Also, perceived power can give a type of influence, e.g. there is positional power – which is the power of authority or personal power – which is the power relationship building and interpersonal skills.

There are three stages to influencing:

A) Prepare the ground 

This is about building relationships and planning how to handle the situation. There are two sides to preparation, the first is about building relationships and gaining information. Effective relationships take time to develop. We need to invest in others so that they feel we can be trusted. It is also important to keep abreast of any issues which are coming up and could impact on a positive outcome.

The second part of preparing is specific to the situation. Always set yourself clear goals, it is not wise to go into an influencing situation without a clear idea of the outcomes or goals you wish to achieve.

Ask and answer the following two questions every time:

1. What do I want to be doing and feeling afterwards?

2. What do I want others to be doing and feeling afterwards?

You also need to think about how a person is likely to react to any suggestions you may make.

B) Managing the situation

During this phase, it is important to establish rapport to build confidence and trust, this is done by:

- Giving attention to the other person

- Maintaining eye contact

- Greeting people warmly

- Using people’s names

- Being aware of your body language

- Encouraging others to speak and avoid constantly interrupting them

Engaging skills

These are the behaviours which help us gain people’s interest; create empathy and common feelings about critical issues. Building trust and understanding between people includes the skills of: 

- Disclosing

- Listening

- Discovering

- Envisaging and empathising

C) Channelling skills, looking forward and concluding

When satisfactory agreement can’t be reached, highlight key points, summarise difficulties, suggest a way forward, seek reactions and agree how to proceed. It is important to summarise the agreement, decisions and actions, and check reactions and show appreciation.

9 Key Questions You Should Ask Yourself When You Are Preparing to Influence:

1. What do you want to achieve?

2. What are the range of things the other person could offer?

3. What would you be prepared to accept? (In other words, what is your fall-back position)

4. How will you approach the conversation? What tactics will you use?

5. What are the facts and figures behind the situation?

6. What objections may they come up with?

7. How will you overcome these objections?

8. When is the best time to influence?

9. Where will you influence?

If our Brexit negotiators follow a few of the hints and tips above, it should go a long way in helping to achieve a satisfactory agreement.  We wish good luck to Theresa May and her team!

Tools to Help Organisations Deal with Brexit

Every organisation will be affected in different ways by Brexit depending on their sector and specific circumstances, and Human Resources/Learning & Development have a key role to play in ensuring that employees are kept informed and reassured during this time of change and transition.

 

1. Present an unambiguous message from the top of the organisation.

This could come from the CEO or the HR function. There must be clear intent to address employee worries and concerns. It is important that this message re-focuses staff on the business, because during times of uncertainty we tend to focus on our own individual problems, which can cause conflict. For some staff, Brexit can have potentially positive outcomes - for example, some may see it as improving the organisation's competitive position, meaning more work and better job security. UK citizens working in the EU and EU nationals working in the UK - people who may be directly affected by Brexit - will need reassurance and support.

 

2. Make sure you have a strong communication strategy.

At this time, communication is key to building trust. It must be a blended communication approach encompassing:

  • A message from the CEO (which should emphasise the fact that 'we are all in this together')
  • Discussion groups
  • Employee forums
  • 'Town Hall' meetings

 

3. Make use of social media.

Social media has a strong part to play in the two-way communication process. A video message from the CEO shown across all social media platforms ensures that all employees globally receive the same message. Many organisations employ staff whose first language is not English, and a video allows these people to assimilate the message at their own pace and in their own time. Most organisations have their own equivalent of Facebook for employees, which is great for creating communities and allows staff to post comments and pose questions that are important to them. This allows for open communication at all levels of the organisation. It is important that this is monitored by HR to maintain understanding of employee needs and concerns. Another advantage of using a video is that millennials prefer videos that allow staff to listen to the tone of voice and also to see the speaker's face.

 

4. Reaffirm the values that are at the core of your organisation.

Many of the organisations we work with have 'integrity' and 'respect for others' as their core business values. Now is the time to keep staff on track - changes are happening, but you are still the same organisation and your values remain the same. Make sure that employees keep the connection and bring them together using the organisation's values as the thread that holds everyone together.

 

5. Equip line managers with the skills required to manage change.

Brexit means that line managers will have to maximise talent to help build a sustainable business. Some of the key areas that they will need to address are:

  • Inclusion & Diversity - Brexit has, in some instances, widened the cracks in society, emphasising our differences in a negative way. Now is the time to invest in Equality & Diversity training; help staff to celebrate our differences, be aware of unconscious bias, and work together to create a work environment where everyone thrives and feels included.

  • Staff Engagement - Managers need some specific skills to engage staff during these challenging times. Donald Trump's rallying cry is 'Putting America First!' During Brexit, some staff will feel threatened, and we don't always think rationally when our emotional brain kicks in. We start to think more about ourselves and less about others, which can impact on collaborative relationships at work. If we do not work well together, this ultimately impacts on team cohesion and productivity. Managers will have to work a lot harder to get a positive response from their staff.

  • Skills Development - As a HR/L&D professional, I recommend that you create your Brexit toolkit using all the hints and tips discussed above. We have found that this sets the foundations for the future and also alleviates stress, helping the organisation to get ahead of the issue. 

Olive with CIPD certificate

When I deliver training on Leadership and Management Skills, I always encourage managers to start with the end in mind - in other words, have a powerful vision of what you would like to achieve and aim for that.

The photograph above is a picture of me receiving an award as a CIPD (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development) volunteer spanning over 20 years. It was a wonderful moment, and all the sweeter because it was totally unexpected! In April of this year, I will be leaving the CIPD Manchester Branch committee so that someone else can have this fantastic opportunity. As I walked towards the front of the room at the Royal College of Physicians in London where I was attending the Council dinner, I started to reflect on how and why I joined the CIPD committee as a volunteer in 1996.

I had worked in the recruitment industry for many years when I decided it was time to enhance my career prospects by enrolling for a post graduate diploma at Salford University. As it was a CIPD qualification, we were encouraged to join our local committee and we were given all the benefits of attending the events that were available to us as CIPD members. As I was keen to start a new career, I joined the committee straight away and started attending branch events.

My first role on the committee was as Newsletter Editor. This coincided with my leaving the recruitment industry and starting a job with Video Arts. So I was involved in Learning and Development in my day job while completing my post graduate diploma in HR in the evening. A large part of my role for Video Arts was a great deal of client liaison, assisting companies with learning at work day events; selecting training resources; creating a learning culture and becoming a learning organisation. These organisations included: Astra Zeneca, Tameside College, Matalan and Manchester Metropolitan University, to name a few. When I became Newsletter Editor, I saw it as an opportunity to draw together local business and the CIPD. Therefore, I persuaded Astra Zeneca to write an article about their brand new, state-of-the-art learning resource centre. Part of my role as Editor was to gain sponsorship from local businesses for the newsletter, and to place adverts and articles in it. I thoroughly enjoyed this role as it played to my strengths, which are:

  • Building relationships
  • Presenting
  • Persuading and influencing
  • Networking
  • Organising events
  • Business strategy

Over the next few years, I held two similar roles: Group Leader of the Bolton geographical group and of the Altrincham group. These were interesting roles that involved working to a budget and organising speakers, suitable venues and sponsorships. The committee of 22 people was involved in making sure we provided our 5,000+ members with over 30 events - all relevant to HR and Learning and Development or up-to-date employment law.

My next role on the committee was Vice Chair for 2 years, then Chair. The Chair's role was one that I relished, leading over 20 volunteers. I wanted to influence the perception of HR, which was not always a positive one. This was made clear to me when, as new Chair, all bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, I visited a company in Wythenshawe where I attempted to encourage the CEO to get involved with the CIPD. His comment was, "What, spend time with HR people? I would prefer to stick pins in my eyes!"

So, together with my fabulous committee, we met and planned our strategy, which was linked to the PACE values of the CIPD. These are:

  • P - Purposeful
  • A - Agile
  • C - Collaborative
  • E - Expert

I did have my challenges as Chair, and on occasion you do wonder if you are doing the right thing. Fortunately, there was a lot of support and advice from previous Chairs, who have formed the Northern Area Partnership (NAP), Wimbledon HQ, and other committee members. We also had a Regional Coordinator, who was an excellent support. When you have 20+ volunteers aged from mid-20s to 70s, with different backgrounds and cultures and some strong personalities, there will always be some disagreement. But it has made me more resilient.

My highlights as Chair were as follows:

  1. Becoming Chair during the CIPD Centenary celebrations and being involved, together with our committee members, in organising a celebration at the Lowry Hotel.
  2. Being asked to host the HR Business Partner conference when it was held here in Manchester.

  3. Being asked to speak at KPMG on workplace pensions.

  4. Speaking at Barclays Bank on annual hours.

  5. Being chosen by Insider magazine 3 years running as one of the top 100 most influential women in business in the North West.

  6. Receiving an award as Showcase Volunteer, CIPD Pace Awards.

My 20 years on the committee have seen me through 3 career changes: working in recruitment, working in the training resources market, and finally working as a consultant and executive coach. During my time as Chair, I met some wonderful people and forged some strong relationships with some fantastic organisations, who provided much support and friendship: Hays Recruitment, TLT Solicitors, Berg, the ACCA Manchester Members' Network, Pro Manchester, and ACAS. These contacts are still current, and some have become lifelong friends.

It has been an enriching experience - I gave a lot and gained a lot, and I would do it all over again! My final role on the committee is that of the HR Leaders leader and Council Representative, both interesting roles that I have thoroughly enjoyed. The next HR Leaders event is on the 8th of March 2017 at Event City. Starting from 6pm, we have Andy Lancaster (Head of Learning & Development Content, CIPD) as our speaker; places are limited, so book early!

You can also join me at the Life of HR conference with Lancashire CIPD, where I am one of the key note speakers, on 25th February 2017. Find out more here.

Tags:

Brexit - just change management by another name?

As a UK based SME with some international clients, the vote to leave the EU came as a shock. I knew that the vote would be close, but I was confident that ultimately Remain would win. Post Brexit I feel it is pointless to rake over the coals, beat our breasts and keep complaining. It has happened and we must move forward. The biggest request we are receiving at the moment from our clients is how we can help managers and leaders to cope with Brexit.

Having experienced a few major recessions in my working life and survived, here are a few of my hints and tips on how to ensure we emerge relatively unscathed. My mantra post Brexit is 'What doesn't kill you makes you stronger', a quote from the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. 

Brexit in effect is a massive change process and the skills required by managers and leaders are the ability to deal with change and uncertainty. They must build better working relationships with team members, ensuring that they listen and communicate, provide reassurance and sometimes counselling for those who need it.

In the middle of this sea of uncertainty - because no one can predict the outcome as yet - we hear on the news about the political upheaval and the internal conflicts within various political parties.  Managers/Leaders must provide a beacon that shines amongst the chaos of all this turbulence.  

Something that staff can cling to has to be our company values.  We must keep reinforcing what we stand for as an organisation and what we believe in. Because the impact on the pound, financial markets, the housing market and uncertainty regarding the status of EU workers means that things will change.  

One thing that remains the same is the innate value and purpose of the company we work for. We need to take action that reflects company values and look for some positives. This could be an opportunity to hone your negotiation and influencing skills and ultimately become more resilient. I know definitely after the last recession where I had to seek new international markets for my consultancy services and grow my business by exporting; I emerged stronger with additional expertise and increased confidence in my abilities.

 

My 4 key tips for managing through Brexit are:

 

  1. Consider the potential changes and the impact on the role of employees and leaders.

  2. Identify the skills and attributes necessary for managing the change. E.g. one of the pre-requisites for our next prime minister is that they must have strong negotiation skills so that they can negotiate the deals we require with the rest of the EU. Similarly as an organisation what skills are required to ensure that you are able to navigate the challenging times ahead? Ideally do you possess the talent within the organisation? If not do you need to recruit the right people?

  3. Recognise the psychological impact that is associated with change, the personal responses that staff may manifest and how this will be dealt with. Coaching, counselling and providing support are critical success factors.

  4. Reflect on the impact of change on the organisation, the team and the individual and the challenges this presents. It is important to involve staff, set up some focus groups ask staff for their input and ideas making sure that staff are engaged and employees feel that they have a voice is crucial.

 

Peter Cheese the CEO of the CIPD says that Brexit is a time when we must demonstrate strong leadership and direction,  even if at the moment we are still experiencing VUCA (which is the acronym used to reflect on the volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity of general conditions).

The main thing to emphasis to our employees is that the 17 million people who voted for Brexit wanted to create something. Within an organisation this could also be an opportunity to create something new but it means that each person is responsible for the outcome, so we are all accountable.

We are pleased to announce that our CEO Olive Strachan has been selected as an Export Champion 2016 to represent the UKTI NW (this initiative is unique to the North West). The first Export Champions were recruited for 2013, and have done a great job spreading the word about the benefits of international trade.

As a region, we in the North West need to sell more products and services overseas, and Olive is determined to encourage and support as many companies as possible to take up the export challenge. Here at OSR, we want to ensure that people know about the opportunities of exporting and the important UKTI North West does. The team alongside Olive are really looking forward to the challenges of 2016 and advocating the excellent work of the UKTI.

We at OSR will be offering courses to support the exporting initiative, including Cultural Sensitivity - A Guide to the Business Culture of the Gulf. This programme will assist UK companies wishing to trade in Gulf markets. It will provide each business with a good knowledge of cultural values and beliefs, as well as essential business etiquette. This course has been developed by experts who have worked and completed business negotiations and traded in the Gulf region. It will arm any professional with the key knowledge required to do business in the Gulf. The programme fits right in with the following OSR Values:

  • Inspiration - Inspiring others to reach their potential
  • Quality - Striving for excellence
  • Passion - Being committed to giving the best we can
  • Integrity - Being authentic at all times
  • Community - Giving something back
  • Collaboration - Providing specialist knowledge

2016 looks like it will be a busy year for OSR, and Olive's dedication and passion shine through at all times. As she steps up to tackle her new responsibilities, she is determined to make exporting great!


Having worked in a professional environment since the beginning of my career there has been a lot of change in the way organisations and individuals do business together. We were not encouraged to share information or work with others, we were told to; Go out there! Close that deal! Make it happen! This was reflected in your PDR’s when you would often be asked the question ‘what have you achieved?’ What added value have you brought to this organisation through your individual effort?

Fast forward to today and how things have changed! The word collaboration or being collaborative is part of most competency frameworks, with employees being encouraged to demonstrate that they are collaborating not only with colleagues within their business but with other organisations that may complement what they do. We are encouraged to increase our visibility through communication and influencing skills.

I have been on the Manchester Branch of the CIPD for many years and the values of the CIPD are around;

P A C E

Which stand for:
  • Purposeful
  • Agile
  • Collaborative
  • Expert
Once again that word Collaborative features as part of the values they hold dear.

As the CEO and founder of Olive Strachan Resources the word collaborate is a call to action. To be collaborative we have to reach out to others and demonstrate the business benefits of working together. In October of this year I experienced collaboration at its best. On 6th October we collaborated with TLT Solicitors to organise The Olive Branch networking event for professional business women. The event involved professional women sitting together to plan an event that would inform, interest and inspire people to come along and give up their valuable time.

TLT were gracious enough to host the event and provide us with a beautiful venue together with a delicious healthy lunch which was extremely popular. The event was in two parts, eating for maximum brain health and managing and retaining your talent. The feedback was extremely positive with everyone saying how worthwhile the event was and they had found it very beneficial. I was also asked ‘when the next event would take place’.

The second successful collaboration was with Hays recruitment specialist who were kind enough to host the CIPD HR Leaders event on 8th October. This was a breakfast event and Chris Maguire the Editor of Insider magazine gave us an insight into the world of newspapers and the changes he had observed over the years. It was rewarding to see a variety of organisations network over coffee and croissants. This event also involved Hay’s inviting along some of their clients who are HR Leaders to network with CIPD Chartered Fellows.

The feedback was fantastic and everyone had appreciated the opportunity to meet other North West businesses and enjoyed sharing insights into current issues. A benchmark of a good event is when an hour after the event has finished, there are still people sitting there reluctant to leave.

What are the benefits of collaborating?
  • We bring people together who would normally never meet in the scheme of things.
  • We learn from each other, each person has a different view point and methodology
  • We form new friendships and links that could be life changing
  • We learn new skills
  • We grow our business
  • We raise our profile in the business world and I could go on and on…
What should you do?
  • If you haven’t already then add collaboration to your marketing and PR plan.
  • Look for organisations that complement your own.
  • Clarify the outcomes of the collaboration so that there is no ambiguity
  • Have planning meetings so that on the day it runs smoothly with each person understanding their role and their contribution to the event.
  • Review and evaluate so that you can make any improvements next time.
Social Media

Use Social media to create some excitement around the event and raise awareness; we made use of twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook. It is very important to liaise with the organisations you are collaborating with so that you have a clear and consistent message.

Big NO NO’s

If you are using a speaker always see them in action before you use them and clarify that if they are good enough their product or service will speak for themselves. The lasting impression is how good your service or product is and NOT a big sales pitch. There is nothing worse than taking time out to go to an event when the speaker does not divulge the information you expect to be imparted. Instead they give you a teaser then proceed to ask you to view their website or read their book or register on their next event costing x amount so you will hear the rest!!

There you have it! So go ahead, collaborate! Share! Enjoy. I felt a sense of pride and achievement at both of my events this week and plan many more! If you feel you would like to work with OSR on future events email olive@olivestrachan.com

Olive Strachan profile

Olive Stracahan is the founder of Olive Strachan Resources, established in 1998 and based in Manchester, United Kingdom. Since setting up her own consultancy, Olive has delivered training that makes an impact all over the world. OSR creates bespoke solutions for any size of business, delivers cost-effective open programmes, and provides specialist advice for companies that do not have a dedicated in-house HR resource. 

Olive is an International Management Consultant, Expert Trainer, Motivational Speaker  and Executive Coach who started her career in the Recruitment industry working as a manager and coach for Reed Employment, Blue Arrow and Addeco.  Olive then pursued a career with Video Arts Training, establishing their first learning resource centre in Manchester. In essence, Olive has been developing Managers for over 25 years. 

Working in over 20 countries has given Olive the experience and understanding of International Business. This experience, combined with a Masters Degree in Human Resources Management, ensures that she is able to understand the issues that face organisations. Olive has travelled extensively and is an experienced facilitator; her main niche incorporates and develops managers, directors and working with individuals to reach their full potential. 

Olive Strachan has received all kinds of awards and accolades for her work as a training consultant. Many different organisations and institutions have acknowledged Olive’s achievements, and her twin talents for training and business coaching continue to earn recognition from all corners of the globe, including awards for:

  • Showcase Volunteer CIPD PACE Award 2014
  • One of the most influential Women in Business in the North West 2013/2014
  • The EMBF North West award for International Business
  • Recognised by the Worldwide Who's Who

Olive has worked with national organisations including Astra Zeneca, The British Council and Manchester City Council, Keele University, Packaging Automation, Irwell Valley Housing, Brand Additions, and international organisations within sectors such as pharmaceuticals, the financial sector, retail, banking, and education. She was also involved in developing the volunteers for the Commonwealth Games when it was held in Manchester. Olive has recently achieved an ILM Level 7 in Coaching and Learning, and she is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. An ex-Chair, of the CIPD Manchester Branch, Olive is presently an HR Leader for the Branch and a CIPD Council Representative.

A fitting tribute - and one of my highlights for the end of the year - was at CIPD's volunteer role models event in London, where we celebrated the CIPD Volunteer PACE Awards, attributable to the CIPD values of being Purposeful, Agile, Collaborative and Expert (PACE). The awards recognise volunteers from the CIPD's regional branches and groups who go above and beyond their responsibilities to provide a valued service to members and local communities. It was also an inaugural event, recognising volunteers from organisations outside of the CIPD for the first time and serving as an opportunity to include the various networks.

Olive Strachan and Peter Cheese

Pictured: Olive Strachan with Peter Cheese, CEO of CIPD

The judging panel was chaired by Anna Kyprianou, Vice-President Membership and Professional Development for the CIPD.

Divided into three award sections, the accolades were:

  • Firstly, presenting certificates of volunteering to celebrate and acknowledge the numerous volunteers who have proven to be a fundamental part of the local regional offer, and a bedrock of volunteer activities.

  • Secondly, and furthermore, the CIPD recognised local leaders, who have led and developed their local committees throughout 2014.

  • Finally, the 'Showcase' awards recognised individuals who delivered something exceptional, and went above usual expectations in their volunteer activities. Also for the first time, external volunteers were recognised, as they too have a huge impact in areas of primary importance to the CIPD.

I was both delighted and honoured to be awarded a Showcase Volunteer Award, presented by the CEO of the CIPD Peter Cheese, alongside representatives of the Professional Speaking Association and the HRNet (part of the Cranfield Trust).

Olive Strachan the founder of OSR Global Training Providers has been named one of the top 100 most influential women in business by the Business Insider North West. 

Throughout the recession Olive has continued to expand her business Global OSR internationally and has successfully held the position of Branch Chair of Manchester CIPD - a very commendable accolade indeed. 

As a Global Entrepreneur, Growth Coach and HR Professional Olive sits comfortably amongst the other 99 women selected, all from different industries representing both the public and the private sector. Many high-profile and prestigious companies are represneted in the lineup, including the White Company, BBC, Trafford Council and The Cooperative Group.

This prestigious accolade is testament to OSR's global success, something which we are very proud of. The list was collated by a selective committee of prominent business people from throughout the region and every woman who was elected was chosen for her influence on the North West business and her contribution to the world of commerce. 

Olive is also a member of the Professional Speakers Association and her name can also be seen in the 'World Who's Who List of Influential Women'. 

Olive's success has been reported on Industry Today and Briefing Wire. This marks yet another fantastic achievement for Olive and OSR Global Training Providers. 

OSR logo with shadow

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